'He gets here and there and kind of tips over' - Paralysed pug needs vital surgery to be able to walk again | TeamDogs
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'He gets here and there and kind of tips over' - Paralysed pug needs vital surgery to be able to walk again

Seven-year-old Boss suffers from severe spinal arachnoid diverticulum and currently uses a wheelchair to get around

Danielle Elton

Posted 3 months ago

(Image - pottery_pug)

A young dog should be enjoying lots of walks and zoomies around the garden, not confined to a wheelchair, but for one poor Pug, that is his reality.

Unable to run around and play with other dogs like he used to, seven-year-old Boss is now sadly paralysed due to a condition known as spinal arachnoid diverticulum (SAD), a build up of fluid which can cause spinal cord compression.

After noticing that Boss was limping, his worried owner Nam Tran took him to the vet suspecting that he might be suffering from hip dysplasia, but an X-ray showed this wasn’t the case.

The 33-year-old owner was advised to take Boss home to get some rest. But after noticing his condition getting considerably worse, Boss was then taken to an MRI specialist where he was diagnosed with SAD.

Nam told TeamDogs: “It’s a bit strange because he is finding it hard because he's still got so much energy, he thinks he can still move.

“He tries to run with every other dog but, you know, he gets here and there and kind of tips over.

(Instagram - pottery_pug)

“We live behind a park and he cant do stuff that a young dog should be doing, and he wants to, you can see it.”

Fortunately for Boss, there’s a very high chance that with surgery he will be able to regain use of his legs. Nam has been advised that there is an 85 to 90 per cent chance of success.

He’s now started a GoFundMe campaign to raise the £12,000 needed for surgery.

He said: “If it was less than this then we really would not. It was way too much money for something that may not work. But the surgeon has done this before and he’s seen various sausage dogs and pugs where it happens to be an 85-90 per cent chance of success rate.”

Speaking about what the surgery will entail, Nam added: "They need to open up his back and then take out the fluid, and then 3D print the spine using a CT scan, and then readjust his spinal cord, because he's got misalignment which is creating this build up of fluid and locking up the back."

Boss clearly means a lot to Nam. He is his first dog, one he never intended to get, until a chance meeting with his owner who was leaving the country and could not take her dog with her.

She gifted him to Nam, a student at the time.

As with many dogs, they have the ability to get us through some hard times and can provide a real sense of comfort.

He said: “Boss has been with us for six years and given us so much in life and saved us mentally and was always there for us.”

An artist with his own pottery studio, Nam has faced struggles while trying to establish his business, especially in the sense of having to find affordable premises.

With times where he thought his only option was to throw in the towel, he told us how Boss has always been there for support.

“Being an art business in London is really tough because not many places have secure rent or affordable rent for artists,” said Nam.

“So we've been pottery nomads for a while and we opened up the pottery studio and have to be moved in a year or so when the building gets redeveloped, especially in East London where gentrification happens a lot.

“So every time we move we have to move all the equipment, the clay, all the kilns, we have to do it by ourselves but it’s me, my partner and my dog that’s been doing this whole move.”

With Boss being there for him when he needed him, Nam now wants to do all he can to help his dog lead the best life he can.

He said: “There's so much life in him. We want to give him the best life until the end.”

To give back to the people donating to his campaign, Nam is offering to make a custom pet bowl to anyone who donates £50 and a pottery class to anyone who donates £100.

With Boss being a familiar face at the pottery studio, he’s had a lot of support so far from former students of his classes.

“When they come into the pottery class, they always hang out with dogs at the beginning, and then come to the class,” said Nam.

“All students kind of know him and always enjoy his energy and presence while they’re doing their pottery classes.”

To donate to Boss’ campaign, visit here.

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